CNA Classes in Wyoming

CNA Classes in Wyoming

Wyoming has standard regulations for its Certified Nursing Assistants. For the most part, all certification is obtained after passing the state competency exam. There are several ways to qualify to challenge this exam, with the most common option being the completion of a state-approved nurse aide training program. Other ways to become qualified include transferring valid certification from another state, military training, and a completed or in-progress nursing degree. Thestate-approved training programs can be found in many different types of institutions, from hospitals to nursing homes to community colleges. Approved programs are required to provide at least 75 hours of instruction to trainees. A portion of these hours are required to be spent gaining hands-on experience with patient care, but trainees are not permitted to interact with patients until a mandatory 16 hours of training is completed. After completing training, the applicant must challenge the competency exam within two years or else repeat their training. The exam is in two parts and both must be passed. The first is a written portion consisting of multiple-choice questions designed to test the trainees’ understanding of nursing science and ethics. The second is a practical portion consisting of five random skill tests based on every day duties expected of CNAs. Passing the test will result in certification, and the CNA can be employed at a number of different types of healthcare institutions.

Salary & Wages

The average salary for CNAs employed in Wyoming is around $25,000. This is above average for CNA wages across the country. In particular, the most experienced CNAs make more than their peers in other states. This can be explained by the low population density in Wyoming, where highly experienced nurse aides are more valuable due to lower supply and higher demand. The pay scale extends along a range between $21,000 and $29,000. The cost of training varies between the many different types of institutions that offer it. The most expensive options will be through universities and community colleges, though seats in these classes may be more readily available than at community centers in the rural state. Federal regulations prohibit employed CNAs from paying for the cost of their training, which is fortunate for those facing financial difficulties. In order to be reimbursed for training expenses, the CNA must have an offer of employment before receiving certification or obtain employment within a year of completing training. This can make it much more reasonable to seek training at expensive institutions.

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